spacer
DAVID COLOSI : DAVID COLOSI - POLY - RUSSELL - BELLE-ILE-EN-MER
spacer

SELECTED WORKS

EXHIBITIONS


BOOKS

VIDEO

READINGS

INTERVIEWS

STATEMENT

BIO

CONTACT

CURRENT

..................

3DLIT

colosi

 

MUSÉE DES MORLAIX
Place des Jacobins, 29600 Morlaix, France
http://musee.ville.morlaix.fr

April 1-June 5, 2016

Drawings: DAVID COLOSI
Paintings: JOHN PETER RUSSELL, COLLECTION MUSÉE DES MORLAIX:
Dépôt du Musée du Louvre – Département des peintures, Fonds Orsay, Legs Jouve
PHOTOS ARE CREDITED BELOW

 

I'd like to thank to Erwan Mahéo and Isabelle Arthuis for inviting me to “Le centre du monde” on Belle-Île-en-mer from October – November 2010, February – March 2014 and March 2016. Thanks also to FRAC Bretagne for acquiring the Port Coton Blues Suite for the exhibition Le centre du monde, 22 March – 11 May 2014 and for lending it to Musée des Morlaix for this exhibition. At the Musée des Morlaix, thanks go to Patrick Jourdan and Béatrice Riou and the entire staff for organizing and mounting this exhibition and in New York to Dorothée Charles of Cultural Services of the French Embassy for introducing it to them. Additional thanks go to La Société Historique of Belle-Île, Geneviéve Tinchant, Anne-Sophie Perraud, Marie Duprat, Éve Laroche-Joubert, Catherine Bastide, Jimmy Raskin and The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council for various assistance in the six-year span of this project. Finally, and substantially, thanks to Pioneer Works in Brooklyn, where much of this new work was made, and to Rowan Renee, Adam Bailey and Hidemi Takagi Bastien for sharing their talents with me.

 

 

 

 

colosi_jacobins_telegramme 2016

photo: Le Télégramme Morlaix

 

 

colosi_Morlaix
colosi_Morlaix

“Polyte was aged and ageless. At eighty-two he was still walking the sixteen kilometers from Le Palais and back to draw his pension – his sabots carried in his hand.”

From Elizabeth Salter, “The Lost Impressionist: A Biography of John Peter Russell.”

« A quatre vingt deux ans Poly parcourait encore les seize kilomètres, à pied, ses sabots à la main, pour aller au Palais percevoir sa pension ».

Tiré de « The lost impressionist : une biographie de John Peter Russell » par Elizabeth Salter

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

tintype photo: Rowan Renee; prosthetic: Adam Bailey

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

photo: Ville de Morlaix

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

“Like Most old salts, he was popular with the children who, said Dorothy Russell, sat around him in a circle while he ate the lunch he brought with him each day in a tin can, to be shared, bite for bite, with his dog. It was at such times that Père Polyte, as the islanders called him, told tales of ships and seas and of the men who sailed upon them. To keep him talking, tidbits were brought to him from the kitchen and the Russells watched round-eyed while he devoured a Stilton ‘grown too lively for the dining room’ and ‘eaten with gusto, maggots and all.’”

From Elizabeth Salter, “The Lost Impressionist: A Biography of John Peter Russell.”

« Dorothy Russell rapporte que le père Polyte, comme l’appelaient les gens du coin, était très apprécié des enfants. Chaque jour ceux-ci venaient  s’assoir en cercle autour de lui et s’amusaient de le voir partager avec son chien le repas qu’il avait amené. Poly leur racontait des histoires de mer, de marins fameux et de bateaux légendaires. Pour qu’il poursuive ses récits on lui apportait des friandises de la cuisine et les Russell le regardaient, médusés, dévorer avec plaisir un bout de fromage trop fait et plein d’asticots ».

Tiré de « The lost impressionist : une biographie de John Peter Russell » par Elizabeth Salter

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

“Today was one of the worst days thus far, and I resolved not to go and work outside … but to prevent myself from falling into a bad mood I got le père Poly to pose for me, and I did a sketch of him which is an extreme good likeness; the whole village had to come and see it, and the funny thing is everyone’s congratulating him on his good fortune as they’re under the impression that I did it for him, and I don’t quite know how to get out of it…”

— Letter from Claude Monet to Alice Hoschedé, [Kervilahouen] 17 November, 1886 —

[Poly] “seized happily on a dedicated, framed photograph of his portrait, which was put up on the wall for Marec’s clients to admire.”

— Daniel Wildenstein —

“Monet maintained his special fondness for this portrait, taking it back to his Giverny studio where it hung above his desk for the remainder of his life. However, he did not only value the portrait as the souvenir of a friendship and a memento of his time on Belle-Île, Monet also made a point of including it in every exhibition of the ‘Belle-Île’ series organized during his lifetime.”

— Ursula Punster —

« … Pour ne pas me laisser aller à la mauvaise humeur j’ai fait poser le père Poly et j’en ai fait une bonne pochade extrêmement ressemblante ; il a fallu que tout le village vienne voir ! Et ce qu’il y a de joli c’est que tout le monde le complimentait, pensant que j’avais fait cela pour lui. Du coup, je ne sais pas trop comment m’en tirer !».

— Lettre de Claude Monet à Alice Hoschedé, [Kervilahouen] 17 novembre 1886 —

« Poly posait fièrement sur une photographie dédicacée de son portrait qui était accrochée chez les Marec ».

— Daniel Wildenstein —

« Monet aimait beaucoup ce portrait. Il l’avait accroché au-dessus de son bureau, dans l’atelier de Giverny. Il ne représentait pas pour lui qu’un simple souvenir de son ami Poly. Tout au long de sa vie il a insisté pour le présenter à côté des autres toiles de la série de Belle-île ».

— Ursula Punster —

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

video still, Live at the Citadelle Vaubon (La Poudriere Circulaire), Belle-Île-en-mer, 2010

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

chroma key portrait: Hidemi Takagi Bastien; prosthetic: Adam Bailey; collage: David Colosi

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

chroma key portrait: Hidemi Takagi Bastien; prosthetic: Adam Bailey; collage: David Colosi

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

The Port Coton Blues Suite (documents, videos and Letters To Poly) 2014
Collection of the FRAC Bretagne, Rennes, France
click here for more information

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

chroma key portrait: Hidemi Takagi Bastien; prosthetic: Adam Bailey; collage: David Colosi

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

chroma key portrait: Hidemi Takagi Bastien; prosthetic: Adam Bailey; collage: David Colosi

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

chroma key portrait: Hidemi Takagi Bastien; prosthetic: Adam Bailey; collage: David Colosi

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

book, 332 pgs. English

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

All paintings by John-Peter Russell:
Dépôt du Musée du Louvre – Département des peintures, Fonds Orsay, Legs Jouve;
Bust of Madame Russell (Marianna Mattiocco) by Auguste Rodin

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

John-Peter Russell: Darlinghurst (Australie), 1858 – 1930
Le pêcheur en bleu, 1904-1906, Huile sur toile
Dépôt du Musée du Louvre – Département des peintures, Fonds Orsay,
Legs Jouve, Inv. RF 1950-25, Inv. D.997.1.1.19

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

John-Peter Russell: Darlinghurst (Australie), 1858 – 1930
Pêcheurs au filet, ca. 1904-1906, Huile sur toile
Dépôt du Musée du Louvre – Département des peintures, Fonds Orsay,
Legs Jouve, Inv. RF 1950-29, Inv. D.997.1.1.18

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

“When [Auguste] Rodin was at Goulphar, he loved the honey and sat near the beehives for hours, watching the comings and goings of the busy critters. One day Polyte approached a hive a little too closely and was stung in the face. It swelled up instantly, and Rodin grabbed some wet clay and pushed it onto the wound. Polyte, though startled at first, found, to his great joy, this to be the perfect remedy.
  “‘Rodin,’ he said, ‘How did you learn this cure for bee stings?!’
  “‘My friend,’ Rodin replied, ‘one day my sister was stung in the ankle, and I had the idea to apply clay to it. It quickly reduced the swelling.’
  “Following this incident, Polyte clung to Rodin with jealous care, which amused us very much, and Rodin was greatly touched because Polyte was a characteristic Breton ‘type’ – independent and proud. He had offered several times to model for Rodin, but outside of Monet and my father, no one could paint him. Even though he loved Berteaux – maybe a little because of the ‘drop’ of alcohol that he partook in ​​from time to time – this was the only weakness we could find in this beautiful type of sailor, who was all righteousness, honesty and integrity.”

From “Rodin Chez Nous”
Memoirs of Jeanne (Russell) Jouve (daughter of John Peter Russell) of Rodin’s visit to Goulphar between the years of 1898-1902).

« Rodin adorait le miel de Goulphar. Il pouvait rester assis près des ruches pendant des heures, à observer les allers et venues des abeilles affairées. Un jour Polyte s’approcha un peu trop près d’une ruche et se fît piquer au visage. Il enfla immédiatement ! Rodin saisi une poignée de terre humide qu’il appliqua sur la plaie, ce qui s’avéra être un remède parfait, à la grande joie de Polyte qui demanda à Rodin d’où il tenait ce remède.  « Un jour ma soeur s’est faite piquer à la cheville, répondit Rodin, et j’eu l’idée de faire un cataplasme d’argile. Ce qui réduisit très vite la contusion ». A partir de ce moment Polyte s’occupa de Rodin avec un soin tout particulier, ce qui nous amusait beaucoup et touchait profondément Rodin car Polyte avait malgré tout un vrai caractère de Breton : indépendant et fier ».

« Rodin Chez Nous »
Memoires de Jeanne (Russell) Jouve (fille de John Peter Russell)

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

“Le Père Poly was then twenty-two years old and clearly remembers the scene [of the escape in 1851 of the political revolutionary Louis Auguste Blanqui and his companion Cazavan from the Citadelle Vaubon in Le Palais]. Poly lived in Kervilaouen at the time and had risen before the crack of dawn to go poaching. The hunt was worth his while, and he collected 38 rabbits. This was at time – he told me – when the city had not yet destroyed the plain hares and rabbits abounded. Today there is nothing, he bemoaned, and the rewards are not worth the effort.
  “Well after sunrise, returning on the road from Radenec, he saw across the field – because on this part of the island you can see a great distance – the plains crawling with Gendarme. Carrying the weight of his good fortune and his rifle, he thought at first he would be pinched. But he quickly realized that this excess of manpower wouldn’t be deployed against ordinary poachers. So instead he imagined that some “evil” had arrived. As he looked closer, with the crowd that had gathered, he saw two fugitives seized by the police. While they waited for a carriage to return them to the Citadelle - because Blanqui refused to walk - they were searched. In patting down Blanqui’s garments, they found that the seams had been lined with gold. In the end, there were enough coins to cover a towel.”

Anatole le Braz – Îles Bretonnes: Belle-Île-en-Mer Sein, notes de voyage, “Encore l’Affaire Blanqui, La version du Père Poly.” Interview from 1908.

L’évasion, en 1851, d’Auguste Blanqui et de son compagnon Cazavan de la citadelle du Palais :

Le père Poly avait vingt-deux ans à l’époque, il se souvient parfaitement de la scène. Il habitait Kervilahouen. Ce matin-là il s'était levé à une heure plus que matinale pour aller braconner.
Alors qu’il rentrait de Radenec, portant quelques lapins et son fusil sur le dos, il vît un grand nombre de gendarmes dans les champs, de l’autre côté du vallon. Il pensa d’abord qu’il allait se faire pincer mais comprit très vite qu'on n'aurait pas déployé tout cet arsenal contre de simples braconniers, et se dit que quelque « malheur » devait être arrivé.
Quand le jour fut complètement levé, il vit, comme les autres badeaux qui s’étaient rassemblés là, deux fugitifs qui venaient d’être arrêtés par les gendarmes. On les fouilla en attendant la voiture qui devait les ramener au pénitencier (car Blanqui refusait de marcher). Une petite fortune en pièces d’or était cachée dans toutes les doublures de leurs vêtements. 

Anatole le Braz – Îles Bretonnes: Belle-Île-en-Mer Sein, notes de voyage, « Encore l’Affaire Blanqui, La version du Père Poly », 1908

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

  “Octave Mirbeau was not a man to be reckoned with. One day he joined us dressed as a Bellois crew member on a fishing adventure where we intended to sell our sardines to the factories in Concarneau. But these fishermen of Concarneau, every summer they infest the waters of Belle-Ile selling us their fish, but, god forbid, a Bellios try to sell his fish to them. Our ship had no sooner anchored in the harbor when it was surrounded by pirates preventing us from offloading. Seeing this, M. Mirbeau rolled up his sleeves and told the captain, “Throw me down there!” To which the captain replied, “They’ll tear you to shreds. Not on your life!” “Take me to the ground, I say,” M. Mirbeau insisted, to which the captain relented. You should have seen it, when the pirates, believing he was a Bellois tried to stop him one even asked if he had really come from Belle-Ile or instead from the thunder of God.”
  Ten days after M. and Mme. Mirbeau returned to the continent, Poly received an unexpected gift. His nephew told him that a pig was waiting for him in Le Palais.
  "A pig? Me? But I have no post box, and I certainly never ordered a pig."
  "I’m telling you, uncle, an employee told me himself, and if you are wise, you won’t wait for it to be starved before claiming it."
  "What a thing! Well it’s worth looking into." So he put on his shoes and walked the 16 kilometers to Le Palais, getting more anxious as he approached. “What if the animal had been sent by mistake, and I have to pay the shipping costs!” As he entered Le Palais, he found the warehouse that held goods delivered from Quiberon, and there he found a pig with a placard on its cage inscribed: "To Mr. Hippolyte Guillaume, Kervilaouen, Belle-Ile-en-Mer, From Octave Mirbeau and Alice."
  “Yes, it was a gift they sent me, the brave hearts! The beast must have cost them at least forty-two francs, and they covered all the expenses, even the warehouse fees. Oh, we fed that piglet, my late wife and I, and believe me, no one went hungry in the village when we killed it.”

Anatole le Braz – Îles Bretonnes: Belle-Île-en-Mer Sein, notes de voyage, “Mirbeau et Monet Ont Passé Par Lá...” Interview from 1908.

« Octave Mirbeau, lui, bourlinguait en mer avec les pêcheurs. C’était un rude homme, un sacré marin, qui n’avait peur de rien! Je me souviens qu’un jour le patron du bateau sur lequel il s’était embarqué voulut aller vendre son poisson aux conserveries de Concarneau, qui payaient plus cher que celles de Belle-île.
« Ces gens de Concarneau sont des brutes, vous savez : ils viennent pêcher ici tous les étés et nous vendre leur poisson. Mais gare au bellilois qui voudrait mettre un pied chez eux!
Le bateau avait à peine mouillé dans le port qu’une bande de forbans faisait déjà barrage sur le quai pour empêcher le déchargement des sardines. Voyant cela, monsieur Mirbeau retroussa ses manches et dit au capitaine : “débarquez-moi!” – à quoi ce dernier répondit : “pour qu’ils vous tombent tous dessus, jamais de la vie!” – Mais Mirbeau insista : “Débarquez-moi vous dis-je!” et sauta à terre. Ah! Mes enfants! Il fallait le voir! Il débarrassa le quai en un tourne-main et lorsqu’on déchargea le poisson, il n’y avait personne pour demander s’il venait de Belle-île ou du tonnerre de Dieu ».
« Le passage de l’auteur de “Calvaire” en ce pays de Kervilahouen fut marqué, pour le père Guillaume, par la plus agréable des surprises qu’il n’ait eut de sa vie :
« Il y avait plus de dix jours que monsieur et madame Mirbeau avaient quitté l’île, leurs vacances terminées, lorsqu’un soir, un des neveux de Poly, de retour du marché, l’informa qu’un cochon l’attendait à la gare maritime du Palais.
« Un cochon ! Pour moi ! Je n’ai pas acheté le moindre cochon ni commandé à qui que ce soit de m’en expédier ! »
« Celui-ci est pourtant bien pour vous, c’est l’employé du la gare qui me l’a dit, et vous feriez bien d’aller le chercher avant qu’il ne meurt de faim ».
« L’affaire valait d’être tirée au clair et, dès le lendemain notre homme se mit en route pour Le Palais. Plus il s’approchait de la ville, plus il étant anxieux : si ce cochon lui avait été expédié par erreur et qu’on le mit en demeure d’en acquitter le montant ! Il descendit les rues du Palais et passa, avec quelque appréhension, la porte de l’entrepôt, pompeusement appelé « la gare », où s’entassaient les marchandises arrivées de Quiberon par le vapeur. Le cochon était là, derrière les barreaux d’une claie sur lesquels était accrochée une pancarte sur laquelle, joyeusement soulagé de ses transes, Poly pouvait lire : « à monsieur Hippolyte Guillaume, Kervilahouen, Belle-île-en-mer. Envoi d’Alice et Octave Mirbeau ».

Anatole le Braz – Îles Bretonnes: Belle-Île-en-Mer Sein, notes de voyage, 1908

 

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

Le Télégramme Morlaix, April 2, 2016

 

 

colosi_Morlaix

photo: Ville de Morlaix

 

 

 


 

colosi

Cr
spacer
© David Colosi